Series One: Speeches, Debates, and Interviews Volume 1: 1841-1846

Pages

THE CHURCH IS THE BULWARK OF SLAVERY
Another text in Liberator, 3 June 1842. From 24 to 27 May 1842 the annual convention of the New England Anti-Slavery Society met in Boston's Chardon Street Chapel, a place described 1. This is the fullest of several early accounts of Douglass's famous "Slaveholder's Sermon," which he gave often during his youthful days as an abolitionist lecturer.
The Union, Slavery, and Abolitionist Petitions
Frederick Douglass attended a quarterly meeting of the Plymouth County Anti-Slavery Society in Hingham, Massachusetts. Present in the crowded church building were the prominent abolitionists William Lloyd Garrison, John A. Collins, George Foster, Edmund Quincy, and escaped slave Lunsford Lane. The presiding officer, Samuel J. May, introduced Douglass as a runaway slave whose personal history it would not be expedient to publicize. An active participant in the floor debates, Douglass supported a resolution that it was slavery and not abolitionism which threatened to destroy the Union, urged the Plymouth County Society to help Lunsford Lane purchase his family from bondage, and described the encouragement slaves derived from abolitionist petitions to Congress.
THE SOUTHERN STYLE OF PREACHING TO SLAVES
Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society (Boston, 1842), 18-19. Another text in Liberator, 4 February 1842. On the evening of 28 January 1842, some 4000 people gathered in Boston's Faneuil Hall to attend a public meeting sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
THE ANTI-SLAVERY MOVEMENT, THE SLAVE'S ONLY EARTHLY HOPE
National Anti-Slavery Standard, 18 May 1843. Other texts in Liberator, 19 May 1843; New York Herald, 10 May 1843; New York Tribune, 10 May 1843; New York Morning Express, 10 May 1843. The American Anti-Slavery Society held its tenth anniversary meeting on 9 May 1843 in New York City.
SOUTHERN SLAVERY AND NORTHERN RELIGION
Concord (N.H.) Herald of Freedom, 16 February 1844.
THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS
Cork Examiner, 7 November 1845 (Supplement). Other texts in Cork Southern Reporter, 6 November 1845; Liberator, 12 December 1845; National Anti-Slavery Standard, 18 December 1845; Foner, Life and Writings, 5 : 10-13.
The Cambria Riot, My Slave Experience, and My Irish Mission
Belfast Banner of Ulster, 9 December 1845 and Belfast Northern Whig, 9 December 1845.
The Slanderous Charge of Negro Inferiority
Belfast Northern Whig, 13 December 1845. Douglass's speech in the Reverend Samuel Hanna's meetinghouse on the evening of 11 December 1845 was the third of seven public lectures he delivered at the invitation of the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society in the winter of 1845-46.
Texas, Slavery, and American Prosperity
Belfast News Letter, 6 January 1846.On the evening of 2 January 1846 Douglass delivered the seventh in a series of lectures sponsored by the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society.
THE BIBLE OPPOSES OPPRESSION, FRAUD, AND WRONG
Belfast News Letter, 9 January 1846. Other texts in Belfast Northern Whig, 8 January 1846; Glasgow Argus, 12 January 1846; London Enquirer, 17 January 1846; National Anti-Slavery Standard, 26 February 1846; Anti-Slavery Bugle, 13 March 1846; Speech File, reel 13, frames 530-34, FD Papers, DLC.
THE FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND AND AMERICAN SLAVERY
Dundee Courier, 3 February 1846.
THE FREE CHURCH CONNECTION WITH THE SLAVE CHURCH
Arbroath (Scot.) Guide, 14 February 1846. Other texts in Liberator, 3 April 1846; Foner, Life and Writings, 5: 22-27, misdated 13 February 1846.

Pages

Bookmark

Bookmarks: