Series One: Speeches, Debates, and Interviews Volume 1: 1841-1846

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THE CHURCH IS THE BULWARK OF SLAVERY
Another text in Liberator, 3 June 1842. From 24 to 27 May 1842 the annual convention of the New England Anti-Slavery Society met in Boston's Chardon Street Chapel, a place described 1. This is the fullest of several early accounts of Douglass's famous "Slaveholder's Sermon," which he gave often during his youthful days as an abolitionist lecturer.
I HAVE COME TO TELL YOU SOMETHING ABOUT SLAVERY
Neither the exact date nor the occasion of this speech can be determined. The person who recorded it, Philadelphia pacifist Edward M. Davis, said that he heard Douglass speak "when on a visit to Lynn, [Mass.]." The address "was delivered with energy," Davis wrote, "and evidently from one unaccustomed to make speeches, yet it came so spontaneously that it thrilled through every one present, and compelled them to feel for the Wrongs he had endured."
The Union, Slavery, and Abolitionist Petitions
Frederick Douglass attended a quarterly meeting of the Plymouth County Anti-Slavery Society in Hingham, Massachusetts. Present in the crowded church building were the prominent abolitionists William Lloyd Garrison, John A. Collins, George Foster, Edmund Quincy, and escaped slave Lunsford Lane. The presiding officer, Samuel J. May, introduced Douglass as a runaway slave whose personal history it would not be expedient to publicize. An active participant in the floor debates, Douglass supported a resolution that it was slavery and not abolitionism which threatened to destroy the Union, urged the Plymouth County Society to help Lunsford Lane purchase his family from bondage, and described the encouragement slaves derived from abolitionist petitions to Congress.
Intemperance and Slavery
From the day of his arrival in Ireland, Douglass had found temperance audiences responsive to his combined attacks on liquor and chattel slavery. On the evening of 20 October 1845 he spoke at Cork's Temperance Institute where Father Theobald Mathew, the Institute's founder and Ireland's most prominent temperance advocate, had arranged a soiree in Douglass's honor. Father Mathew introduced Douglass to the audience, praising him for being a "consistent and faithful teetotaler." Observer Ralph Varian reported in the Truth Seeker that "above 200 respectable inhabitants of Cork," including the mayor and "some of the most influential men of the city," were present for the occasion.
THE SOUTHERN STYLE OF PREACHING TO SLAVES
Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society (Boston, 1842), 18-19. Another text in Liberator, 4 February 1842. On the evening of 28 January 1842, some 4000 people gathered in Boston's Faneuil Hall to attend a public meeting sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
THE ANTI-SLAVERY MOVEMENT, THE SLAVE'S ONLY EARTHLY HOPE
National Anti-Slavery Standard, 18 May 1843. Other texts in Liberator, 19 May 1843; New York Herald, 10 May 1843; New York Tribune, 10 May 1843; New York Morning Express, 10 May 1843. The American Anti-Slavery Society held its tenth anniversary meeting on 9 May 1843 in New York City.
SOUTHERN SLAVERY AND NORTHERN RELIGION
Concord (N.H.) Herald of Freedom, 16 February 1844.
MY SLAVE EXPERIENCE IN MARYLAND
National Anti-Slavery Standard, 22 May 1845. Other texts in New York Evangelist, 8 May 1845; Liberator, 16 May 1845; Concord (N.H.) Herald of Freedom, 16 May 1845. Douglass's Narrative was only days from publication when he addressed the Twelfth Annual Convention of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York City's capacious Broadway Tabernacle on 6 May 1845. The National Anti-Slavery Standard exulted that the attendance was "larger than it has been for several years," though the Liberator believed the gathering would have been larger still had the meeting been properly advertised.
IRISH CHRISTIANS AND NON-FELLOWSHIP WITH MAN-STEALERS
Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent, 4 October 1845. Other texts in Dublin Freemen's Journal and Weekly Commercial Advertiser, 4 October 1845; Waterford (Ire.) Mail, 8 October 1845; Liberator, 7 November 1845; National Anti-Slavery Standard, 27 November 1845.
MY EXPERIENCE AND MY MISSION TO GREAT BRITAIN
Cork Examiner, 15 October 1845. On the morning of 14 October 1845, Douglass attended an antislavery breakfast given by several Cork abolitionists at Lloyd's Hotel. Some of the town's leading citizens, including the mayor, were present.
I AM HERE TO SPREAD LIGHT ON AMERICAN SLAVERY
Cork Southern Reporter, 16 October 1845 (Supplement). Another text in Cork Examiner, 15 October 1845. On the afternoon of 14 October 1845, approximately a week after arriving in Cork, Douglass delivered an antislavery lecture in the city courthouse. The Southern Reporter noted that long before the meeting was scheduled to begin, the building was "densely crowded in every part." The gallery was "thronged with ladies" who seemed to "take the liveliest interest in the proceedings." The Cork Examiner reported the presence of "over one hundred ladies" and a "large audience of respectable gentlemen and citizens."
SLAVERY CORRUPTS AMERICAN SOCIETY AND RELIGION
Cork Examiner, 20 October 1845 and Cork Southern Reporter, 18 October 1845. Another text in London Inquirer, 25 October 1845. Douglass's speech before a public meeting in Cork's Wesleyan Chapel on 17 October 1845 was attended by a large company of, to use Douglass's characterization, "highly intelligent and influential people, . . . abolitionists . . . of the true stamp."

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