Series One: Speeches, Debates, and Interviews Volume 1: 1841-1846

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MY EXPERIENCE AND MY MISSION TO GREAT BRITAIN
Cork Examiner, 15 October 1845. On the morning of 14 October 1845, Douglass attended an antislavery breakfast given by several Cork abolitionists at Lloyd's Hotel. Some of the town's leading citizens, including the mayor, were present.
MY SLAVE EXPERIENCE IN MARYLAND
National Anti-Slavery Standard, 22 May 1845. Other texts in New York Evangelist, 8 May 1845; Liberator, 16 May 1845; Concord (N.H.) Herald of Freedom, 16 May 1845. Douglass's Narrative was only days from publication when he addressed the Twelfth Annual Convention of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York City's capacious Broadway Tabernacle on 6 May 1845. The National Anti-Slavery Standard exulted that the attendance was "larger than it has been for several years," though the Liberator believed the gathering would have been larger still had the meeting been properly advertised.
SLAVERY CORRUPTS AMERICAN SOCIETY AND RELIGION
Cork Examiner, 20 October 1845 and Cork Southern Reporter, 18 October 1845. Another text in London Inquirer, 25 October 1845. Douglass's speech before a public meeting in Cork's Wesleyan Chapel on 17 October 1845 was attended by a large company of, to use Douglass's characterization, "highly intelligent and influential people, . . . abolitionists . . . of the true stamp."
American Prejudice and Southern Religion
On the evening of 4 November 1841, members of the Plymouth County Anti-Slavery Society, together with "New England freemen" and at least one "southern gentleman," reassembled at the church in Hingham, Massachusetts, to consider resolutions postponed during their afternoon session. Urging the audience to support a resolution condemning racial prejudice, Edmund Quincy argued that this "unnatural prejudice, not implanted by God . . . will not cease while slavery lasts; for men always hate those whom they injure."
The Cambria Riot, My Slave Experience, and My Irish Mission
Belfast Banner of Ulster, 9 December 1845 and Belfast Northern Whig, 9 December 1845.
The Slanderous Charge of Negro Inferiority
Belfast Northern Whig, 13 December 1845. Douglass's speech in the Reverend Samuel Hanna's meetinghouse on the evening of 11 December 1845 was the third of seven public lectures he delivered at the invitation of the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society in the winter of 1845-46.
BAPTISTS, CONGREGATIONALISTS, THE FREE CHURCH, AND SLAVERY
Belfast News Letter, 26 December 1845 and Belfast Northern Whig, 25 December 1845. Other texts in Belfast Banner of Ulster, 26 December 1845; Anti-Slavery Bugle, 20 February 1846; Liberator, 20 March 1846.
Texas, Slavery, and American Prosperity
Belfast News Letter, 6 January 1846.On the evening of 2 January 1846 Douglass delivered the seventh in a series of lectures sponsored by the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society.
THE BIBLE OPPOSES OPPRESSION, FRAUD, AND WRONG
Belfast News Letter, 9 January 1846. Other texts in Belfast Northern Whig, 8 January 1846; Glasgow Argus, 12 January 1846; London Enquirer, 17 January 1846; National Anti-Slavery Standard, 26 February 1846; Anti-Slavery Bugle, 13 March 1846; Speech File, reel 13, frames 530-34, FD Papers, DLC.
AN ACCOUNT OF AMERICAN SLAVERY
Glasgow Argus, 22 January 1846. Other texts in Anti-Slavery Bugle, 29 May 1846; Speech File, reel 13, frames 5 3 5 - 4 2 ; FD Papers, DLC

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