Series One: Speeches, Debates, and Interviews Volume 1: 1841-1846

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IRISH CHRISTIANS AND NON-FELLOWSHIP WITH MAN-STEALERS
IRISH CHRISTIANS AND NON-FELLOWSHIP WITH MAN-STEALERS
Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent, 4 October 1845. Other texts in Dublin Freemen's Journal and Weekly Commercial Advertiser, 4 October 1845; Waterford (Ire.) Mail, 8 October 1845; Liberator, 7 November 1845; National Anti-Slavery Standard, 27 November 1845.
Intemperance and Slavery
Intemperance and Slavery
From the day of his arrival in Ireland, Douglass had found temperance audiences responsive to his combined attacks on liquor and chattel slavery. On the evening of 20 October 1845 he spoke at Cork's Temperance Institute where Father Theobald Mathew, the Institute's founder and Ireland's most prominent temperance advocate, had arranged a soiree in Douglass's honor. Father Mathew introduced Douglass to the audience, praising him for being a "consistent and faithful teetotaler." Observer Ralph Varian reported in the Truth Seeker that "above 200 respectable inhabitants of Cork," including the mayor and "some of the most influential men of the city," were present for the occasion.
MY EXPERIENCE AND MY MISSION TO GREAT BRITAIN
MY EXPERIENCE AND MY MISSION TO GREAT BRITAIN
Cork Examiner, 15 October 1845. On the morning of 14 October 1845, Douglass attended an antislavery breakfast given by several Cork abolitionists at Lloyd's Hotel. Some of the town's leading citizens, including the mayor, were present.
MY OPPOSITION TO WAR
MY OPPOSITION TO WAR
Liberator, 3 July 1846. Another text in Speech File, reel 13, frames 564- 67, FD Papers,DLC.
MY SLAVE EXPERIENCE IN MARYLAND
MY SLAVE EXPERIENCE IN MARYLAND
National Anti-Slavery Standard, 22 May 1845. Other texts in New York Evangelist, 8 May 1845; Liberator, 16 May 1845; Concord (N.H.) Herald of Freedom, 16 May 1845. Douglass's Narrative was only days from publication when he addressed the Twelfth Annual Convention of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York City's capacious Broadway Tabernacle on 6 May 1845. The National Anti-Slavery Standard exulted that the attendance was "larger than it has been for several years," though the Liberator believed the gathering would have been larger still had the meeting been properly advertised.
SEND BACK THE BLOOD-STAINED MONEY
SEND BACK THE BLOOD-STAINED MONEY
Renfrewshire Advertiser, 2 May 1846.
SLAVERY AND THE AMERICAN CHURCHES
SLAVERY AND THE AMERICAN CHURCHES
Bristol Mercury and Western Counties Advertiser, 5 September 1846. Other texts in Bristol Mirror, 5 September 1846; Bristol Times, 5 September 1846; London Inquirer 12 September 1846.
SLAVERY AS IT NOW EXISTS IN THE UNITED STATES
SLAVERY AS IT NOW EXISTS IN THE UNITED STATES
Bristol Mercury and Western Counties Advertiser, 29 August 1846. Other texts in Bristol Gazette, 27 August 1846; Bristol Times and Bath Advocate, 29 August 1846; Bristol Great Western Advertiser and Chronicle, 29 August 1846; Bristol Mirror, 29 August 1846.
SLAVERY ATTACKS HUMANITY
SLAVERY ATTACKS HUMANITY
Birmingham Midland Counties Herald, 2 July 1846 and London Patriot, 2 July 1846. Another text in Birmingham Journal, 4 July 1846.
SLAVERY CORRUPTS AMERICAN SOCIETY AND RELIGION
SLAVERY CORRUPTS AMERICAN SOCIETY AND RELIGION
Cork Examiner, 20 October 1845 and Cork Southern Reporter, 18 October 1845. Another text in London Inquirer, 25 October 1845. Douglass's speech before a public meeting in Cork's Wesleyan Chapel on 17 October 1845 was attended by a large company of, to use Douglass's characterization, "highly intelligent and influential people, . . . abolitionists . . . of the true stamp."
SLAVERY EXISTS UNDER THE EAVES OF THE AMERICAN CHURCH
SLAVERY EXISTS UNDER THE EAVES OF THE AMERICAN CHURCH
Liverpool Mercury, 23 October 1846 (Supplement). Other texts in British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Reporter, ser. 2, 1 : 145 (1 September 1846); Liverpool Standard, 20 October 1846; Liverpool Times, 20 October 1846; Liverpool Mail, 24 October 1846; Liverpool Journal, 24 October 1846.

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